What questions are essential for you to ask every guest before accepting a booking?


#1

As we all know, communicating expectations with your guest is always important… but it can also be pretty tricky to navigate. If you can ask the right questions early on in the conversation, hopefully you’ll be better informed to make a call on whether the activity is the right fit for your space.

What are some questions you always ask your guests before accepting a booking? Some examples might be…

  • “Do you plan to bring alcohol?”
  • “Do you expect the guest count to change?”
  • “Do you have any questions about our rules?”

#2

Do you need help getting a film permit and certificate of insurance?

Maybe this is happening already, but I’d sure like guests to have to “CONFIRM” acceptance of house rules.


#3

We ask for guests to confirm the number of people that will be on-site and reiterate that if they go over that number then they may be subject to a higher rate.


#4

What DON’T you ask??? I guess everything you can think of pertaining to their specific usage. Time frame, crew size, what they are bringing, what else (if anything) do they need, etc… We had one crew that wanted to rent the place and told us they were expecting 50 guests. Just to be sure, I asked again on the date of the walk-thru and they said it could be more like 500! Well, obviously this was a deal breaker for us. Sometimes, it’s good to ask and if you have any doubts, RE-ask to make sure the stories line up with what you can expect.


#5

I always ask why my guests are interested in this particular property. That leads to a series of other questions that help me identify things about the character of the person. I’m not looking for charming. I’m looking for intelligence and honesty. The rest takes care of itself.


#6

Great suggestions here!
I usually ask for more details on how they plan to use the space, what they plan to bring in regards to food/drinks, and if they need any of the extras we offer (extra chairs, white board, etc).
I love the idea of asking if they have any questions about the rules - great way to ensure that they review the listing in detail without nagging them about it before every booking (which is what I currently do).


#7

I’m going to use these questions. Very basic yet important information.


#8

What is the amount of people that will be coming to the shoot? How many cars will you be bringing in? Do you need assistance with acquiring film permits with the city?


#9

I always make sure to ask them if they have read the space rules, understand that there is no alcohol if there is anyone underage at the event, and that they understand our capacity. Funny enough, the capacity one is the one that a lot of inquiries seem to overlook. For some reason it seems that they think that they can bring as many people as they want, ha ha, or they just don’t read the capacity number. Another big one for me is to make sure they understand that set-up and clean-up time are both included in the booking. A lot of inquiries think they can come 30 minutes before and leave 30 minutes late without paying. It’s probably so they can save money, but I always let them know that the time they book is the time they have in the space.


#10

How many people, cast & crew total.
Still imagery, or film/video?
What equipent will you be bringing in?
Will you need to move or remove any furniture?
Can you supply liability and property damage insurance?


#11

Are you all finding that potential renters understand the Peerspace rules about keeping the communication and negotiations on the site? I am getting lots that challenge me on this as though it’s my personal policy. I am also getting many that ask if they can give a deposit or pay after the event or How to pay. I have not booked on Peerspace so I am curious if these folks are intentionally giving me a had time or if Peerspace is not clear on the renter end? I might have to try booking a space to see for myself. your thoughts?


#12

I think there is the whole range Gina, from those new to renting to those trying to work an angle. After reading about some of the rentals-gone-bad on here I am finding myself a little more suspicious of certain inquiries. Some people are curt so it feels like they are hiding something, but some people are just crap at communicating. A challenge to sort it all out.

To me it is a bit of a red flag when people want to jump on the phone right away. I usually tell them I am busy/shooting but happy to answer any questions they may have (via Peerspace). During site visits people often ask how to book: “Can I give you a depost? Do we go through you? Can I pay in cash?” That’s where it’s a short conversation for me: No, you can book through Peerspace.

Another challenge of course is that nobody reads. So you can present a wealth of information about the process and they will still ask “Can you tell me about your space?” and “How do I book?” All the best!


#13

Thanks Brad,
I think now as I get more experienced with communicating with the renters on Peerspace , I am finding the right balance. I may have lost a few but It’s all good. I had one who communicated several times then said she found another place…then weeks later she said none of the places she was inquiring with worked out so she kept thinking about my space…I answered all her questions again and agreed to allow everything she requested. She stopped communicating.

So I see how this works now. It is tricky at first but I am starting to get bookings. I got a 5 star on my first sight unseen one hour booking. It was perfect. I let them in 15 mins before their time…It was storming out so they appreciated it. They all left on time when the hour was up…maybe 10 mins to get shoes and coats back on.

I am enjoying navigating though it all.

gina