Important (but gross) toilet etiquette question

I have a small rental space that includes a private bathroom with only one toilet.
There’s the standard sign posted above the toilet stating “No flushing anything but toilet paper” and another sign above the bathroom trash can reiterating that everything else needs to be put in there…HOWEVER ever since I’ve been renting the space (about a year) I’ve had to interrupt about 3-4 events and bring in the plumbing snake to fix a clog. This is no fun for anyone.
Prior to renting the space this is where I operated my small business and never had problems with the plumbing. I can only assume the problems now are because guests are flushing things that are not supposed to be flushed.
Has anyone else dealt with this? What can I do besides the standard signage that will make it abundantly clear that the plumbing WILL clog? Thanks for any advice!

Hi,

I have this issue as well, put a trashcan in the stall so they do not put anything other than toilet paper in the toilet. You have the signs which is adequate enough.

We’ve gone the route of being extra explicit and it seems to be working so far (despite a similar setup of small private bathroom). Instead of just saying “Nothing but toilet paper” we have a small basket containing those little dog-poop trash bags and a sign that reads “Bags for diapers, baby wipes, tampons, and pads. Please dispose in the waste basket.” I think some people assume certain things are OK to flush, even though they aren’t.

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Interesting! So far our toilet hasn’t risen like the mighty Mississippi, but we do keep a garbage can in there just in case

Great idea Aaron, I will have to do the same.

Same problems. I’ve done all you say. In addition, for shoots over 15 people I require they rent a portable potty. I explain that plumbing back-ups are not fun & they get it.

Like every other rule you make, some people will abide by it and others simply won’t. One problem is often that you are talking to the host or leader but THAT person never tells the rest of their guests or the crew. Parties are obviously worse than productions. We’ve generally not had a lot of problems with legitimate productions but parties are another story. We are just about OUT of the party business as they can be rude, out of control and generally disobedient. We tell them to limit the dB’s on the music (we have a dB meter now) and they agree until you leave the room and then some guest says “turn it up!” and the DJ goes right along.

If you want to avoid problems, avoid parties. The people are not there to do a job and outside of the host, they couldn’t care less whose house it is. In fact, many who are used to AirBnB don’t even expect to see the owner on site. That’s another problem…